Something Smells A Little Fishy

Today our agenda including visiting the fish market. We woke up bright and early, as we do every morning. After a delicious breakfast, we headed out to the cars. We were yet again swarmed by a group of sellers who seemed to always come back with handmade baskets, spoons made from cow horns, and an assortment of bracelets and necklaces. Most of the group members already had a collection of these items so we said goodbye to them and headed to the lake. To our surprise they arrived at the fish market at the same time as us but on foot. The dedication to make a sale is admirable.

While waiting for Dr. Willis to negotiate prices and hire a guide, the students were able to enjoy watching the mujas (dogs), uncos (monkeys), and baby goats. We were also fascinated by the storks walking among the people. I noticed children holdings bags of fish which they would use to feed the storks so I wanted to check it out. I was handed a slimy piece of fish and told to throw it up in the air. As I threw it up, the storks sprawled their wings and stretched their necks. I was frightened the storks would charge at me so I thanked the boys and joined the rest of the group.

A little intimidating when they are this close right?

A little intimidating when they are this close right?

Feeding the storks.

Feeding the storks.

Cute little monkey just chilling.

Cute little monkey just chilling.

We learned that there are three kinds of fish in this lake, goldfish, catfish, and tilapia. There are 52 boats and each boat catches up to 300 fish a day. The guide told us that 250 goes to the main market, and 50 stay here to be sold to various people who all prepare the fish uniquely. We asked how young the boys are when they begin fishing and the guide told us as young as 4 or 5 with manual fishing, then they will be trained to fish in the boats. I am still so fascinated by the level of maturity and amount of hardwork the children in this country have.

Hand made cotton fish net.

Hand made cotton fish net.

Boys gutting and scaling the fish.

Boys gutting and scaling the fish

After the fish market, we went to the main market. Due to it being market day and thus even busier, we were advised to not bring our phones or anything we did not abslotuely need so unfortunetly I do not have pictures of our adventures at the market. We all still had a great time walking around and comparing his market to Hiyak. This market was a little more organized and we had more room to walk between the stalls. Clothing, shoes, grains, spices, crops, everything we had expected and more. I ended up buying a block of fresh sugar cane but made sure to put my toothbrush stick to use afterwards to prevent cavaties and decay.

Our next adventure, Whataburger. Random right? But it is real, they had the official sign from Texas. After a long wait, we finally got our burgers and they were very delicious. Ethiopian food is great but it was a nice break to taste American food for once.

Whataburger!

Whataburger!

Enjoying Ethiopian Whataburger burger and fries.

Enjoying Ethiopian Whataburger burger and fries.

We are all obviously missing home, but there is so much more work to do and places to explore. Starting with our first home and hospital visits tomorrow.

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